THE TRACE –

THE FRUIT WAS SWEETER THEN. THE FISH WERE MORE PLENTIFUL.

In collaboration with artist Jason Phu, Antidote has commissioned a series of works responding to our current thematic exploration – ‘The Trace’. Presented in conjunction with a group show at Wellington St Projects from March 14-25, Jason’s work ‘The fruit was sweeter then. The fish were more plentiful.’ will be showing at the upstairs gallery of Alaska Projects from March 9.

“A nostalgic meditation on familial ties and the experience of diaspora that can penetrate intergenerationally. From the Northern most tip of China to the lowest valleys in the South, the work emanates reverberations of such a lineage through every day life in Australia.”

KINTSUGI

“Give away the stone – let the waters kiss and transmutate these leaden grudges into Gold”

Kintsugi (Kin = golden Tsugi = joinery) is an ancient Japanese practice where broken ceramics are repaired with golden lacquer to consciously emphasise, rather than disguise, the fracture as part of the object’s history. The concept posits that an item is truly beautiful and whole, only when fully acknowledging the damage it has endured. Responding to this poetic Japanese art form, as well as lyrics from ‘The Grudge’ by Tool, Kintsugi brings together the experimental storytelling practices of four multi-disciplinary artists based in Australia. From the topography of the Calais Refugee Camp in northern France to the glacial scars in Tasmania’s Central Highlands, the exhibition reframes and transforms instances of trauma into profound and illuminative experiences.

Curated by Grace Partridge – Featuring works by Jacobus Capone, Stanislava Pinchuk, James Tylor and Zan Wimberley.

Exhibition details to come.

James Tylor, Turralyendi Yerta (Tindo Kakirra Yerta ) 2017, Photograph with ochre and charcoal, 50x50cm. Image courtesy of the Artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery.

Click here to see our 2017 exhibitions

 

THE TRACE

“Face the living past in the dying present”

Whether it be a distant pang of loss or a tremor of shame for past wrongdoings, ‘traces’ are like a scar on our collective subconscious, punctuating our personal and collective histories as markers of misfortune. To bring these traces into the light, to reanimate and recontextualise them, is to face the past with a profound depth of meaning, to attempt to heal ourselves and to feel the visceral echoes of our potential. Responding to Anthony Bond’s curatorial essay ‘TRACE – A Historical Contextualisation of the theme’, Antidote invites audiences to inhabit the traces of five artists, presenting rich visual narratives of violence and volatility, loss and misfortune and strategies for adaptation and survival.

Curated by James Nguyen and Grace Partridge – Featuring works by Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Rushdi Anwar, Zanny Begg, Justin Dingwall, and Lindy Lee.

Exhibiting at Wellington St Projects from March 14 – 25, 2018.

Justin Dingwall, Mob II, photographic print, 84 X 60 CM, Edition 4/10, 2016. Courtesy of the Artist and .M Contemporary. 

KAWITA VATANAJYANKUR

Curated by Grace Partridge

Plunging viewers into a dreamlike world of candy-bright hues and mind-bending physical performance, Kawita Vatanajyankur uses her dynamic video art as a springboard to explore the value and understanding of manual domestic labour. This exploration of the often-invisible domestic work is particularly telling of her Thai homeland. A place where, for many, daily chores aren’t always assisted by electronic contraptions or white goods but are instead time-consuming, physically exhausting, and often the task of women. The videos’ happy, day-glow colours, dark humour and undercurrents of violence, however, bring a universality and contemporary currency to the historical trajectory of feminist art.

Antidote is proudly presenting Vatanajyankur’s acclaimed video work, which be a continuation of her newly premiered series at the inaugural Bangkok Biennale in 2018.

Exhibiting at Alcaston Gallery from October 17 – November 10, 2018. Read more here.

Kawita Vatanajyankur The Scale of Justice, 2016, from Machinized, single channel HD video, 2:32 minutes. Courtesy of the artist and Nova Contemporary Bangkok and Alamak! Project / Clear Edition & Gallery, Tokyo. 

Click here to see our 2017 exhibitions  

 

THE TRACE 

“Face the living past in the dying present” – Whether it be a distant pang of loss or a tremor of shame for past wrongdoings, ‘traces’ are like a scar on our collective subconscious, punctuating our personal and collective histories as markers of misfortune. To bring these traces into the light, to reanimate and recontextualise them, is to face the past with a profound depth of meaning, to attempt to heal ourselves and to feel the visceral echoes of our potential. Responding to Anthony Bond’s curatorial essay ‘TRACE – A Historical Contextualisation of the theme’, Antidote invites audiences to inhabit the traces of five artists, presenting rich visual narratives of violence and volatility, loss and misfortune and strategies for adaptation and survival.

Curated by James Nguyen and Grace Partridge – Featuring works by Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Rushdi Anwar, Zanny Begg, Justin Dingwall, and Lindy Lee.

 

Exhibiting at Wellington St Projects from March 14 – 25, 2018.

THE TRACE –

THE FRUIT WAS SWEETER THEN. THE FISH WERE MORE PLENTIFUL.

In collaboration with artist Jason Phu, Antidote has commissioned a series of works responding to our current thematic exploration – ‘The Trace’. Presented in conjunction with a group show at Wellington St Projects from March 14-25, Jason’s work ‘The fruit was sweeter then. The fish were more plentiful.’ will be showing at the upstairs gallery of Alaska Projects from March 9.

“A nostalgic meditation on familial ties and the experience of diaspora that can penetrate intergenerationally. From the Northern most tip of China to the lowest valleys in the South, the work emanates reverberations of such a lineage through every day life in Australia.”

 

KAWITA VATANAJYANKUR

Curated by Grace Partridge

Plunging viewers into a dreamlike world of candy-bright hues and mind-bending physical performance, Kawita Vatanajyankur uses her dynamic video art as a springboard to explore the value and understanding of manual domestic labour. This exploration of the often-invisible domestic work is particularly telling of her Thai homeland. A place where, for many, daily chores aren’t always assisted by electronic contraptions or white goods but are instead time-consuming, physically exhausting, and often the task of women. The videos’ happy, day-glow colours, dark humour and undercurrents of violence, however, bring a universality and contemporary currency to the historical trajectory of feminist art.

Antidote is proudly presenting Vatanajyankur’s acclaimed video work, which be a continuation of her newly premiered series at the inaugural Bangkok Biennale in 2018.

 

Exhibiting at Alcaston Gallery from October 17 – November 10, 2018. Read more here.

KINTSUGI

“Give away the stone – let the waters kiss and transmutate these leaden grudges into Gold”

Kintsugi (Kin = golden Tsugi = joinery) is an ancient Japanese practice where broken ceramics are repaired with golden lacquer to consciously emphasise, rather than disguise, the fracture as part of the object’s history. The concept posits that an item is truly beautiful and whole, only when fully acknowledging the damage it has endured. Responding to this poetic Japanese art form, as well as lyrics from ‘The Grudge’ by Tool, Kintsugi brings together the experimental storytelling practices of four multi-disciplinary artists based in Australia. From the topography of the Calais Refugee Camp in northern France to the glacial scars in Tasmania’s Central Highlands, the exhibition reframes and transforms instances of trauma into profound and illuminative experiences.

Curated by Grace Partridge – Featuring works by Jacobus Capone, Stanislava Pinchuk, James Tylor and Zan Wimberley.

 

Exhibition details to come.

Images: 1. Justin Dingwall, Mob II, photographic print, 84 X 60 CM, Edition 4/10, 2016. Courtesy of the Artist and .M Contemporary. 2. Jason Phu, vintage image from home. 3. Kawita Vatanajyankur The Scale of Justice, 2016, from Machinized, single channel HD video, 2:32 minutes. Courtesy of the artist and Nova Contemporary Bangkok and Alamak! Project / Clear Edition & Gallery, Tokyo. 4. James Tylor, Turralyendi Yerta (Tindo Kakirra Yerta ) 2017, Photograph with ochre and charcoal, 50x50cm. Image courtesy of the Artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery.